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GCRF Inequalities and skills acquisition in young people – Closing date 22 March 2018

GCRF Inequalities and skills acquisition in young people

The ESRC is pleased to invite proposals for new research grants that qualify for funding from the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF). This call aims to fund a portfolio of innovative research grants focusing on skills acquisition in developing countries. (Closing date 22 March 2018.)

http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding/funding-opportunities/gcrf-inequalities-and-skills-acquisition-in-young-people/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

 

International Centre for Public Pedagogies Seminar Series – CRISIS AND EDUCATION (Glenn Rikowski) – 21st February 2018, 5.00 – 6.00pm, ED4.02

International Centre for Public Pedagogies Seminar Series

We are delighted to announce the next instalment in our series. Colleagues from all schools are welcome.

CRISIS AND EDUCATION

Glenn Rikowski

University of Lincoln, UK

 

International Centre for Public Pedagogies (ICPuP)

UNIVERSITY OF EAST LONDON

Stratford Campus

Water Lane

London

E15 4LZ

 

21st February 2018

5.00 – 6.00pm

Room: ED4.02

 

ABSTRACT

There are two parts to the presentation. Following a brief examination of the concept of ‘crisis’ the first part provides a critique of the Classical Theory of education crisis. This is the default theory of education crisis utilised by the majority of educational theorists and education activists today. Its starting point is that education crises are basically derivative of economic crises. The works of Marxists Brian Simon and Madan Sarup are important in fixing and consolidating the Classical Theory of education crisis. These will be explored in some depth.

The second part of the paper is more speculative. It seeks to pinpoint education crises as crises for capital. Thus, it is concerned with working on the weaknesses in the rule of capital (in education and in terms of its development) rather than focusing on how crises originating in the economy have deleterious effects for state-financed, public education. Two forms of education crises for capital are located, based on the mode of existence of commodity forms in educational institutions: crises of labour-power production; and crises in the ‘general class’ of commodities in educational settings. The implications for an anti-capitalist, anti-affirmationist politics of education based on this analysis are provided in conclusion.

Please note: Glenn is writing two papers for this event. These will be available to read in advance and if you would like to receive them please respond to r.firth@uel.ac.uk

 

Biographical details: Dr. Glenn Rikowski is a Visiting Fellow in the College of Social Science at the University of Lincoln. From 2001-2013 he was a senior lecturer in Education Studies in the School of Education at the University of Northampton.

The International Centre for Public Pedagogy (ICPuP) was founded in 2013, it is based in the Cass School of Education and Communities, and is cross-disciplinary with other members from Psychology and Performing Arts. Public pedagogy is a relatively new area of educational scholarship that considers the application and development of educational theory and approaches beyond formal schooling. Public pedagogy therefore includes analysis, investigation and action research in contexts such as cultural education, public spaces, non-formal learning, technology and education, popular culture and political struggle. The centre hosts seminars once a month during term time. Staff from all schools and students are welcome.

Professor Sir Peter Scott’s seminar ‘Fair access and social mobility: lessons from Scotland’ to be held at UEL on 7th March, 5.00-6.30 PM, Cass School, ED2.04, UEL Stratford Campus

UEL Higher Education Research seminar

Cass School of Education and Communities, College of Professional Services

Date/Time: 7 March 2018, 5.00-6.30 PM.

Venue: Cass School, ED2.04, UEL Stratford Campus

Speaker: Professor Sir Peter Scott, Commissioner for Fair Access, Scottish Government/ (emeritus) Professor of Higher Education Studies, UCL Institute of Education, University College London

Convener: Dr. Terri Kim, Reader in Comparative Higher Education; RSVP: Terri Kim (t.c.kim@uel.ac.uk )

 

TITLE:  Fair access and social mobility: lessons from Scotland 

ABSTRACT:

Fair access to higher education, and widening participation, have become major policy priorities in both England and Scotland – and in most other European countries. Despite mass expansion of student numbers patterns of social stratification have changed little, with young people from the most privileged social backgrounds being between three and four times more likely to participate in higher education than those from the most deprived social backgrounds (and the latter being concentrated in less prestigious institutions). England and Scotland have adopted different approaches – England relying on access agreements made between institutions and the Office for Fair Access (OFFA), which has now been rolled into the new Office for Students, to mitigate the potentially negative effects of high fees; and Scotland fair access targets set by the Scottish Government which has retained free higher education. However, the debate about fair access in higher education needs also to be seen in the wider context of stalled social mobility in the decade since the 2008 financial crisis, and subsequent economic recession – and also the increasing social inequality resulting from the erosion of the welfare state, and the widespread adoption of pro-market neo-liberal economic policies by many Governments.

CV:

Peter Scott is (emeritus) Professor of Higher Education Studies at the UCL Institute of Education and also Scotland’s first Commissioner for Fair Access, who made his first annual report to the Scottish Government at the end of last year. Formerly he was Vice-Chancellor of Kingston University in London, a member of the board of the Higher Education Funding Council for England and – after leaving Kingston – Chair of the Council at the University of Gloucestershire. His most recent book is (with Jim Gallacher and Gareth Parry) New Languages and Landscapes of Higher Education (Oxford University Press 2017)

ISCF Audience of the Future Workshops Cardiff: 1st Feb | London: 2nd Feb | Manchester: 5th Feb | Glasgow: 12th Feb

Cardiff: 1st Feb | London: 2nd Feb | Manchester: 5th Feb | Glasgow: 12th Feb

On 27th November 2017, BEIS published the Industrial Strategy – Building a Britain fit for the future White Paper. The Industrial Strategy includes a number of valuable opportunities for the Creative Industries, including a proposed £33m challenge fund for the Audience of the Future.

This programme of workshops, organised by KTN/Immerse UK on behalf of Innovate UK and the Research Councils, presents an opportunity for delegates to learn more about the proposed Audience of the Future programme, as well as a chance to meet other businesses, researchers, etc. and build new collaborations. Feedback will inform and influence grant funding opportunities.

Find out more and register for workshops through the following link: http://www.immerseuk.org/news-1/2018/1/9/iscf-audience-of-the-future-workshops

 

BOOK LAUNCH: Education, Equality and Human Rights: Rights: Issues of Gender, ‘Race’, Sexuality, Disability and Social Class

A Book Launch by: Mike Cole, Simon Forrest, Jane Kelly, Alpesh Maisuria, Jane Martin, Peter McLaren and Richard Rieser.A Book Launch by: Mike Cole, Simon Forrest, Jane Kelly, Alpesh Maisuria, Jane Martin, Peter McLaren and Richard Rieser.

Book Launch

Cass School of Education and Communities,

Room RB.G.13, Stratford Campus, University of East London, Water Lane, London E15 4LZ

31 January 2018 – 17.00-19.00

 
The fourth edition of Education, Equality and Human Rights has been fully updated to reflect the economic, political, social and cultural changes in educational and political policy and practice, as austerity continues and in the light of the EU referendum. Written by a carefully selected group of experts, each of the five equality issues of gender, ‘race’, sexuality, disability and social class are covered as areas in their own right as well as in relation to education. Key issues explored include:

  • human rights, equality and education
  • women and equality, historically and now
  • gender and education perspectives throughout time
  • racism in the UK from the Empire to the present
  • racism and education from imperial times to the May government
  • the making and remaking of sexualities
  • the challenges surrounding teaching and learning about sexuality in schools
  • the struggle for disability equality
  • inclusive education
  • social class, Marxism and socialism
  • social class inequality and education.

With an uncompromising and rigorous analysis of education and human rights and a foreword from Professor Peter McLaren, Education, Equality and Human Rights is an essential resource across a wide range of disciplines and for all those interested in education, social policy and human rights. The launch will be followed by a drinks reception.

RVSP: Diane Sharrier, D.Sharrier@uel.ac.uk & John Coleman, J.coleman@uel.ac.uk
Mike Cole is Professor of Education at the University of East London, UK.His latest books are Racism: A Critical Analysis (2016); Critical Race Theory and Education: A Marxist Response, Revised Second Edition (2017), and New Developments in Critical Race Theory and Education: Revisiting Racialized Capitalism and Socialism in Austerity (2017).

 
Simon Forrest is Professor of Social Sciences in Medicine and Head of the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health at Durham University. He has a background in school teaching and research related to young people’s sexual lifestyles, risks, relationships and identities. He has co-authored a book supporting teaching about homosexuality in the context of schools, Talking About Homosexuality in the Secondary School (AVERT , 1997), and has since published numerous papers and other articles in the field of young people’s sexual attitudes and lifestyles. He is Chair of the Board of Trustees at AVERT , a leading global AID S charity, and contributes to local and national initiatives aiming to support boys and young men.

 
Jane Kelly taught Art History and Women’s Studies at Kingston University until she retired in 2002. Since then she has been involved in Southwark Day Centre for Asylum Seekers which has three day centres, each open one day a week. In addition, she has recently re-joined the Labour Party.

 
Alpesh Maisuria is a Senior Lecturer with an expertise in social class and educational policy. He is current research is based on the neo-liberalisation of education in England, drawing upon Marxism and critical realism to understand these developments as ideologically driven. He also has an interest in Swedish social democracy and communism and education policy. He is also Deputy Editor of the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS).

 
Jane Martin is Professor of Social History of Education at the University of Birmingham. Her first book, Women and the Politics of Schooling in Victorian and Edwardian England, won the History of Education Society (UK) Book Prize in 2002. She has published widely in various international journals in the field of gender and education, history of education, sociology of education and women’s history. She is joint editor of the Routledge Progressive Education Series. Her most recent book is Making Socialists: Mary Bridges Adams and the Fight for Knowledge and Power, 1855–1939 (Manchester University Press, 2013). Future publications include Gender and Education in England since 1770: A social history to be published in the Palgrave Macmillan Gender and Women’s History Series in 2018; and a biography of author, teacher and socialist Caroline Benn (1926–2000).

 
Peter McLaren is Distinguished Professor in Critical Studies, College of Educational Studies, Chapman University, where he serves as Co-Director of the Paulo Freire Democratic Project and International Ambassador for Global Ethics and Social Justice. He is also Honorary Chair Professor at Northeast Normal University, China, where he serves as Honorary Co-Director of the Centre for Critical Pedagogy Research. Professor McLarenis the author and editor of 45 books, and his writings have been translated into 30 languages.

 
Richard Rieser is a disabled teacher, trainer, writer, speaker, campaigner, film maker, and an international advocate/consultant for inclusive education and disability equality in many countries around the world. He runs World of Inclusion Ltd (www.worldofinclusion.com). As a disabled teacher, Richard taught for 25 years in primary, secondary, FE, and lastly as an Advisory Teacher for Inclusion in the London Borough of Hackney. After this he became full-time Director of the charity Disability Equality in Education, which trained over 120,000 education professionals. All Richard’s work is prompted by disability equality, inclusion and the social model of disability. Richard was UKDPC representative at the Ad hoc Committee framing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. H e is author of the only handbook on implementing Article 24: Inclusive Education, for the Commonwealth. He has held many positions, including UK Rep on the European Disability Forum from 2004 to 2012, Chair of the Alliance for Inclusive Education and Vice Chair of Council for Disabled Children for 12 years and on various UK government committees. He is Coordinator of UK Disability History Month (www. ukdhm.org). Recently, World of Inclusion won an award at the Zero Conference, 2016 for a series of anti-disablist bullying films and resources.